Information

VIN Decodes For Dodge & Plymouth

Dodge 1967-1969


1st digit - Model.  (D) Dodge Polara / Monaco, (L) Dodge Dart, (W) Dodge Coronet, (X) Dodge Charger.

2nd digit - Price Class. (P) Premium, (S) Special

3rd and 4th digits - Body Style.  (21) 2 Door Sedan, (23) 2 Door Hardtop, (27) Convertible, (29) 2 Door Sports Hardtop, (41) 4 Door Sedan, (43) 4 Door Hardtop, (45) 6 Passenger Station Wagon, (46) 9 Passenger Station Wagon

5th digit - Engine.  (A) 170 6 cyl, (B) 225 6 cyl, (C) Special Order 6 cyl, (D) 273 V8, (E) 273 4bbl V8, (F) 318 V8, (G) 383 V8, (H) 383 4bbl V8, (J) 426 V8 Hemi, (K) 440 4bbl V8, (L) 440 4bbl V8 high performance, (M) Special Order V8 (440 6-pack), (P) 340 V8

6th digit - Model Year.  (7) 1967, (8) 1968, (9) 1969

7th digit - Assembly Plant.  (1) Lynch Rd, Detroit, MI, (2) Hamtramck, MI, (3) Jefferson Assembly, Detroit, MI, (4) Belvidere, IL, (5) Los Angeles, CA, (6) Newark, DE, (7) St. Louis, MO, (8) Export, (9) Windsor, ON

8th to 13th digits - Sequential production number




Dodge 1970 - 1974


1st digit - Model.  (D) Dodge Polara / Monaco, (J) Dodge Challenger, (L) Dodge Dart / Demon, (W) Dodge Coronet or Charger (in 72-73), (X) Dodge Charger.

2nd digit - Price Class.

3rd and 4th digits - Body Style.  (21) 2 Door Sedan, (23) 2 Door Hardtop, (27) Convertible, (29) 2 Door Sports Hardtop, (41) 4 Door Sedan, (43) 4 Door Hardtop, (45) 6 Passenger Station Wagon, (46) 9 Passenger Station Wagon

5th digit - Engine.  (B) 198 6 cyl, (C) 225 6 cyl, (E) Special Order 6 cyl, (G) 318 2bbl V8, (H) 340 4bbl V8, (J) 340 6bbl V8 or 360 V8 (in 74), (K) 360 2bbl V8, (L) 383 2bbl V8 or 360 4bbl (in 73), (M) 400 2bbl V8, (N) 383 4bbl V8 high performance, (P) 400 4bbl V8, (R) 426 V8 Hemi, (T) 440 4bbl V8, (U) 440 4bbl V8 high performance, (V) 440 6bbl V8, (Z) Special Order V8

6th digit - Model Year.  (0) 1970, (1) 1971, (2) 1972, (3) 1973, (4) 1974

7th digit - Assembly Plant.  (A) Lynch Rd, Detroit, MI, (B) Hamtramck, MI, (C) Jefferson Assembly, Detroit, MI, (D) Belvidere, IL, (E) Los Angeles, CA, (F) Newark, DE, (G) St. Louis, MO, (H) New Stanton, PA, (T) Windsor, ON

8th to 13th digits - Sequential production number




Plymouth 1966


1st digit - Model.  (B) Plymouth Barracuda, (P) Plymouth Fury, (R) Plymouth Belvidere, (V) Plymouth Valiant.

2nd digit - Price Class.

3rd and 4th digits - Body Style.  (21) 2 Door Sedan, (23) 2 Door Hardtop, (27) Convertible, (29) 2 Door Sports Hardtop, (41) 4 Door Sedan, (42) 4 Door Town Sedan, (43) 4 Door Hardtop, (45) 6 Passenger Station Wagon, (46) 9 Passenger Station Wagon

5th digit - Engine.  (A) 170 6 cyl, (B) 225 6 cyl, (C) Special Order 6 cyl, (D) 273 V8, (E) 318 V8, (F) 361 V8, (G) 383 V8, (H) 426 V8 Hemi, (J) 440 V8, (K) Special Order V8

6th digit - Model Year.  (6) 1966

7th digit - Assembly Plant.  (1) Lynch Rd, Detroit, MI, (2) Hamtramck, MI, (3) Jefferson Assembly, Detroit, MI, (4) Belvidere, IL, (5) Los Angeles, CA, (6) Newark, DE, (7) St. Louis, MO, (8) Export, (9) Windsor, ON

8th to 13th digits - Sequential production number




Plymouth 1967 - 1969


1st digit - Model.  (B) Plymouth Barracuda, (P) Plymouth Fury, (R) Plymouth Belvidere, (V) Plymouth Valiant.

2nd digit - Price Class.

3rd and 4th digits - Body Style.  (21) 2 Door Sedan, (23) 2 Door Hardtop, (27) Convertible, (29) 2 Door Sports Hardtop, (41) 4 Door Sedan, (43) 4 Door Hardtop, (45) 6 Passenger Station Wagon, (46) 9 Passenger Station Wagon

5th digit - Engine.  (A) 170 6 cyl, (B) 225 6 cyl, (C) Special Order 6 cyl, (D) 273 V8, (E) 273 4bbl V8, (F) 318 V8, (G) 383 V8, (H) 383 4bbl V8, (J) 426 V8 Hemi, (K) 440 4bbl V8, (L) 440 4bbl V8 high performance, (M) Special Order V8, (P) 340 V8

6th digit - Model Year.  (7) 1967, (8) 1968, (9) 1969

7th digit - Assembly Plant.  (1) Lynch Rd, Detroit, MI, (2) Hamtramck, MI, (3) Jefferson Assembly, Detroit, MI, (4) Belvidere, IL, (5) Los Angeles, CA, (6) Newark, DE, (7) St. Louis, MO, (8) Export, (9) Windsor, ON

8th to 13th digits - Sequential production number




Plymouth 1970 - 1974


1st digit - Model.  (B) Plymouth Barracuda, (P) Plymouth Fury, (R) Plymouth Belvidere / Satellite / Sebring, (V) Plymouth Valiant / Scamp.

2nd digit - Price Class.

3rd and 4th digits - Body Style.  (21) 2 Door Sedan, (23) 2 Door Hardtop, (27) Convertible, (29) 2 Door Sports Hardtop, (41) 4 Door Sedan, (43) 4 Door Hardtop, (45) 6 Passenger Station Wagon, (46) 9 Passenger Station Wagon

5th digit - Engine.  (B) 198 6 cyl, (C) 225 6 cyl, (E) Special Order 6 cyl, (G) 318 2bbl V8, (H) 340 4bbl V8, (J) 340 6bbl V8 or 360 V8 (in 74), (K) 360 2bbl V8, (L) 383 2bbl V8 or 360 4bbl (in 73), (M) 400 2bbl V8, (N) 383 4bbl V8 high performance, (P) 400 4bbl V8, (R) 426 V8 Hemi, (T) 440 4bbl V8, (U) 440 4bbl V8 high performance, (V) 440 6bbl V8, (Z) Special Order V8

6th digit - Model Year.  (0) 1970, (1) 1971, (2) 1972, (3) 1973, (4) 1974

7th digit - Assembly Plant.  (A) Lynch Rd, Detroit, MI, (B) Hamtramck, MI, (C) Jefferson Assembly, Detroit, MI, (D) Belvidere, IL, (E) Los Angeles, CA, (F) Newark, DE, (G) St. Louis, MO, (H) New Stanton, PA, (T) Windsor, ON

8th to 13th digits - Sequential production number





1968 Plymouth Road Runner

In 1968, Plymouth decided that muscle cars had gotten too far from their original purpose: cheap (and very fast) thrills. The company paid $50,000 to Warner Brothers to affix a certain cartoon bird onto its new vehicle, which was based on a stripped Belvedere pillared coupe body, and the Road Runner was born. The standard engine was MOPAR's 383 cid powerplant, which was treated to the heads; manifolds, camshafts, valve springs, and crankcase windage tray from the race ready 440 Magnum that was rated at 335bhp and 425lb-ft. This was coupled with numerous other performance features including beefed up suspensions, manual transmissions, brakes, and tires. The interior was basic, a no bench seat and no carpeting - just rubber floor mats. The main attration was a base price of $2896. For those who wanted a little bit extra, there was one engine option; for $714 Plymouth would slide in a 426 Hemi. Although the Hemi clashed with the budget based principle of the Road Runner, 1/4-mile times in the low 13s needed no apologies. A hardtop coupe and functional hood vents were added mid year during 1968. A horn that went "beep-beep" complimented the roadrunner decals (in gray due to time constraints) that were standard on all Road Runners. Plymouth originally estimated that it would sell 2,500 vehicles in 1968; it actually sold 45,000 vehicles. The 1968 Road Runner is perhaps the second most significant muscle car to the 1964 Pontiac GTO as it shifted the market back to its horsepower made affordable concept.

Production Numbers
​2D Pillared Coupe: 29,240
2D Hardtop Coupe: 15,359

​Engines Offered
383 V8 335 bhp @ 5200 rpm, 425 lb-ft @ 3400 rpm.
426 Hemi V8 425 bhp @ 5000 rpm, 490 lb-ft @ 4000 rpm.




1969 Plymouth Road Runner

​Due to the success of the 1968 Road Runner, Plymouth decided to offer more choices. A convertible was added to the existing hardtop and pillared coupe body styles and bucket seats were added as an option. The Road Runner decals were now in color. Joining the existing 383 and 426 Hemi engines were a choice of 440 cid V8s, a four barrel version rated at 375 bhp, and a three-two barrel 440 cid V8. Known as the "440 + 6", this engine provided Hemi-like acceleration for about half the price. Included with the 440+6 engine were simple, black wheels, a flat black fiberglass lift-off hood, and a large, functional hood scoop. Similar to the hood scoop found on the Dodge Super Bee, this was one of the most efficient MOPAR hood scoops. Buyers responded to Plymouth’s decision by buying 82,109 vehicles.


Production Numbers
2D Pillared Coupe: 33,743
2D Hardtop Coupe: 48,549
Convertible: 2,218


Engines Offered
383 V8 335 bhp @ 5200 rpm, 425 lb-ft @ 3400 rpm.
426 Hemi V8 425 bhp @ 5000 rpm, 490 lb-ft @ 4000 rpm.
440 V8 375 bhp @ 4600 rpm, 480lb-ft @ 3200 rpm.
440+6 V8 390 bhp @ 4700 rpm, 490 lb-ft @ 3200 rpm.

















1970 Plymouth Road Runner


The Road Runner received fresh new front and rear styling for 1970. The "Six Pack" hood was dropped, but all Road Runners were now available with an optional Air Grabber Hood. This consisted of a under the dash switch which would open a power operated trap door on the hood, revealing a shark cartoon with the words "Air Grabber." Just what you need to psyche out the competition at the stoplight. The "Air Grabber" would automatically close when the engine was turned off, to keep out the elements. The engine choices remained the same, although the Hemi went from solid to hydraulic lifters for improved durability and the standard four-speed manual became an option, as a strengthened three-speed manual was made standard.


Production Numbers
2D Pillared Coupe: 15,716
2D Hardtop Coupe: 24,944
Convertible: 824


Engines Offered
383 V8 335 bhp @ 5200 rpm, 425 lb-ft @ 3400 rpm.
426 Hemi V8 425 bhp @ 5000 rpm, 490 lb-ft @ 4000 rpm.
440 V8 375 bhp @ 4600 rpm, 480lb-ft @ 3200 rpm.
440+6 V8 390 bhp @ 4700 rpm, 490 lb-ft @ 3200 rpm.




1971 Plymouth Road Runner


1971 saw the beginning of the end of the era of muscle cars. In just its fourth year, the Road Runner saw its performance engines fall victim to tightening government regulations on emissions and fuel economy. The standard 383 power plant dropped 35 bhp while the 440 engines both lost 5 bhp. The 426 Hemi stayed fast at 425 bhp. This would be the last year for the Hemi, as it too would fall victim to the increased standards. Both the 2 Door Pillared Coupe and the Convertible body styles were dropped, leaving only the 2 Door Hardtop as the only offering.


Production Numbers
2D Hardtop Coupe: 14,218


Engines Offered
383 V8 300 bhp @ 4800 rpm, 410 lb-ft @ 3400 rpm.
426 Hemi V8 425 bhp @ 5000 rpm, 490 lb-ft @ 4000 rpm.
440 V8 370 bhp @ 4600 rpm, 480lb-ft @ 3200 rpm.
440+6 V8 385 bhp @ 4700 rpm, 490 lb-ft @ 3200 rpm.




1972 Plymouth Road Runner

The Road Runner received a redesigned rear bumper and side markers along with electronic ignition, 60 series tires, and a rear sway bar. The front bumper now had two vertical slots for the bumper jack and the Road Runner received a new grille. Due to increasing emission standards, the 383 V8 and the 426 Hemi were dropped. A new 400 cid V8 was introduced rated at 255 bhp. The GTX was now available as an option on the Road Runner and came only with the 440 engines.


Production Numbers   
2D Hardtop: 7,628


Engines Offered
340 V8 240 bhp. (SAE Net)
400 V8 255 bhp. (SAE Net)
440 V8 280 bhp. (SAE Net)
440+6 V8 330 bhp. (SAE Net)


Dodge was the last one to have an entry in the pony car category, the Challenger. The Challenger debuted with an engine lineup that ranged from a slant six, 440 Six Barrel and the 426 Hemi.



1970 Dodge Challenger

The Dodge Challenger was based on the Plymouth Barracuda platform, but its wheelbase was stretched by two inches to provide more interior room. The Challenger was offered in both hardtop and convertible versions. Performance versions wore the R/T (Road/Track) badge and either the base or R/T model could be ordered with the SE luxury package. The SE package included leather seats and a vinyl roof with a smaller "formal" rear window. Challenger R/T's came standard with the 335 bhp 383 engines. Optional were two 440 engines, the four-barrel Magnum with 375 bhp and the three-carb Six Pack with 390 bhp.  Topping the list was the almighty 426 Hemi with 425 bhp. The Hemi cost an additional $1,228 and required heavy-duty equipment. The 440s and the Hemi came standard with TorqueFlite automatic transmission. Optional was a four-speed manual transmission, which included a pistol grip Hurst shifter and a Dana 60 axle. Gear axles climbed from 3.23:1 to 4.10:1, with limited slip as an option. All R/Ts received a heavy-duty suspension and the 440s and Hemi received 15 inch 60 series tires, although essentials such as power steering and front disc brakes were still optional. The R/T's standard hood had two hood scoops, but they did not feed directly into the air cleaner. For just $97.00, the buyer could specify the shaker scoop, which mounted to the air cleaner and stuck up through an opening in the hood. It was known as the "shaker" as it vibrated along with the engine. Some faults of the Challenger included poor outward visibility and it feeling too bulky for its size.


But Dodge had one more trick up its sleeve. In order to race in the Sports Car Club of America's Trans American Sedan Championship, it built a street version of its race car (just like Plymouth with its Plymouth 'Cuda’ AAR), which it called the Dodge Challenger T/A (Trans Am). Although the race cars ran a destroked version of the 340, street versions took the 340 and added three carbs atop an Edelbrock aluminum intake manifold, creating the 340 Six Pack. Dodge rated at the 340 Six Pack at the same 290 bhp rating as the original 340 engine (and mysteriously the same rating as the Camaro Z/28 and Ford Boss 302 Mustang), it actually made about 350 bhp. It breathed air through a suitcase sized air scoop molded into the pinned down, lift off matte-black fiberglass hood. Low-restriction dual exhausts ran to the stock muffler location under the trunk, and then reversed direction to exit in chrome tipped "megaphone" outlets in front of the rear wheels. TorqueFlite automatic or Hurst-shifted four-speed transmission, 3.55:1 or 3.90:1 gears, manual or power steering were available. Front disc brakes were standard. The special Rallye suspension used heavy-duty parts and increased the camber of the rear springs. The T/A was among the first production vehicles to use different size tires front and rear: E60x15 fronts, and G60x15 in back. The modified camber elevated the tail enough to clear the rear rubber and its side exhausts outlets, thick side stripes, bold ID graphics, and a ducktail spoiler. The interior was strictly stock Challenger. Unfortunately, the race Challenger T/A wasn't very competitive and the street version suffered from severe under steer in fast corners. But it could turn mid 14s in the quarter mile which would do any small block muscle car proud. The T/A would only be available for 1970, as Dodge would pull out of Trans Am racing.

Production Numbers
Challenger Base: 53,337
Challenger T/A: 2,142
Challenger R/T Coupe: 12,747
Challenger R/T Convertible: 1,070
Challenger RT/SE Coupe: 3,679

Engines Offered
225 I6 145 bhp.
340 V8 275 bhp @ 5000 rpm, 340 lb-ft @ 3200 rpm.
T/A: 340+6 V8 290 bhp @ 5000 rpm, 345 lb-ft @ 3400 rpm.
383 V8 330 bhp.
426 Hemi V8 425 bhp @ 5000 rpm, 490 lb-ft @ 4000 rpm.
440 V8 375 bhp @ 4600 rpm, 480 lb-ft @ 3200 rpm.
440+6 V8 390 bhp @ 4600 rpm, 480 lb-ft @ 2300 rpm.
















1971 Dodge Challenger 


In 1971, the Dodge Challenger received a new grille and several other changes from 1970. The Challenger T/A was advertised but was never produced and was officially dropped (as Dodge had withdrawn from Trans Am racing). The R/T convertible was also dropped and the SE package was only available on base model Challengers. The R/T for 1971 had color-keyed bumpers, dummy brake cooling slots on its rear flanks, and new tape stripes. The 383 engine was still standard on R/T models, but it was reduced to 300 bhp due to a lower compression ratio to meet new government regulations. The base 440 was dropped, but the 440-6, rated at 385 bhp (down 5 bhp from 1970) and the Hemi, still rated at 425 bhp was still available. But that didn't stop a severe sales slide as sales fell 60% in just the Challenger's second year. A small group of Dodge dealers tried to boost Challenger sales in 1971 by providing 50 specially prepared examples as official and pace cars for the Indianapolis 500 race. All of these cars were Hemi Orange convertibles with white interior, although just two had high-performance options. One -- the pace car -- skidded and crashed into a press box, injuring a number of reporters. Not surprisingly, the pace car decal sets available through Dodge dealers did not sell well.


Production Numbers
Challenger Base: 23,088
Challenger Base Convertible: 2,165
Challenger R/T Coupe: 4,630
Challenger R/T Convertible: Not available 
Challenger RT/SE Coupe: Not available


Engines Offered
225 I6 145 bhp.
318 V8 230 bhp.
340 V8 275 bhp @ 5000 rpm, 340 lb-ft @ 3200 rpm.
T/A: 340+6 V8 290 bhp @ 5000 rpm, 345 lb-ft @ 3400 rpm.
383 V8 300 bhp.
426 Hemi V8 425 bhp @ 5000 rpm, 490 lb-ft @ 4000 rpm.
440 V8 375 bhp.
440+6 V8 385 bhp @ 4600 rpm, 480 lb-ft @ 2300 rpm.




1972 Dodge Challenger

The 1972 Challenger gained new front-end styling, which included a new egg crate grille, which had down turned ends. The R/T performance version was dropped and convertibles were eliminated. The 440 and Hemi were also dropped. A new Rallye edition replaced the R/T model, but sported only a 318 with just 150 bhp (net). The largest engine available was a 340 with just 240 bhp (net), a far cry from just the year before.


Production Numbers
Challenger Base: 18,535
Challenger Rallye Coupe: 8,123


Engines Offered
318 V8 150 bhp. (SAE Net)
340 V8 240 bhp. (SAE Net)


Production: Engines: 318 V8 150 bhp. 340 V8 240 bhp.
Performance:




1973 Dodge Challenger

The Dodge Challenger continued its downward slide for 1973. The Rallye edition was dropped, although buyers could still purchase them on the option sheet. Sales were still up for the year, even though most of these cars had the 318 with 150 bhp, hardly a performance machine. Still available was the 340 with 240 bhp but it was replaced at mid-season with a new 360 V8 debuted with 245 bhp. The increased capacity was the only way that Dodge could keep power up in the face of tightening emissions control regulations.


Production Numbers 32,596


Engines Offered
318 V8 150 bhp. (SAE Net)
340 V8 240 bhp. (SAE Net)
360 V8 245 bhp. (SAE Net)




1974 Dodge Challenger 

​1974 would be the last year for the Dodge Challenger; still available with the 360 for those that wanted any real performance. The Dodge Challenger lived just five short years, but it made its mark on the muscle car era.


Production Numbers 16,437


Engines Offered
318 V8 150 bhp. (SAE Net)
360 V8 245 bhp. (SAE Net)




1970 Plymouth Barracuda

Plymouth finally produced performance car for 1970, and they went full force into it. The Barracuda was moved over to the E-body platform, which it shared with the new Dodge Challenger. The Barracuda rode on a two-inch shorter wheelbase than the similar Dodge Challenger, even though its overall body dimensions were the same. The performance models were called 'Cudas’ and featured five different V8s, the 340, 383, 440, 440+6, and the 426 Hemi. The 440s and the Hemi cars received a special high performance suspension to put all that power to the road. Standard Barracudas came with a flat hood, while 'Cudas’ came with standard dual non-functional hood scoops. Optional on all 'Cudas’ (and standard on Hemi's) was a very functional shaker scoop, so named because it attached directly to the engine, and rose up through a cut out in the hood. The Hemi cost $871 and was installed on just 652 hardtops (out of 17,242) and 14 convertibles out of 550. It was equipped with hydraulic lifters and was easier to tune than in previous years. The 440+6 was $250 and could keep up with the Hemi till about 70 mph. Both engines were tricky to drive; the 440+6 vacuum-actuated front and rear carbs came on with little warning, while the Hemi's stiff throttle linkage sometimes snapped all eight barrels open at once.


Plymouth also built a special model for 1970: the Plymouth AAR 'Cuda’. AAR was taken from Dan Gurney's All-American Racers, which raced 'Cudas’ in he Sports Car Club of America Trans-Am racing series. But whereas Ford and Chevrolet built special models (Boss 302 Mustang and Camaro Z28) meant to mimic the racecars, Plymouth built a street rod. Along with the similar Dodge Challenger T/A, the AAR 'Cuda’ sported a unique 340 cid V8 with 3x2 carbs that pumped out 290 bhp. The exterior was definitely unique with a matte-black lift-off fiberglass hood, through body-side strobe stripes, tri-colored AAR shield, and standard black ducktail spoiler. The AAR 'Cuda’ also had special shocks and recambered rear springs which raised the rear end 1 3/4 inches over the regular 'Cuda’ which allowed clearance for exhaust pipes that exited in front of the rear wheel well (after routing through the standard muffler beneath the trunk). It also permitted the use of larger tires in the rear, one of the first uses of wider rear tires on a production automobile.

Production Numbers
'Cuda’ Hardtop Coupe: 18,880
'Cuda Convertible: 635
AAR 'Cuda: 1,500 (estimated)

Engines Offered
340 V8 275 bhp @ 5000 rpm, 340 lb-ft @ 3200 rpm.
AAR: 340+6 V8 290 bhp @ 5000 rpm, 345 lb-ft @ 3400 rpm.
383 V8 335 bhp.
426 Hemi V8 425 bhp @ 5000 rpm, 490 lb-ft @ 4000 rpm.
440 V8 375 bhp @ 4600 rpm, 480 lb-ft @ 3200 rpm.
440+6 V8 390 bhp @ 4600 rpm, 480 lb-ft @ 2300 rpm.



1971 Plymouth Barracuda

The Plymouth Barracuda continued into 1971 with minor styling changes, including a segmented grille with twin headlamps, dummy front fender vents, and segmented tail lamps. A full range of engines was available and the top performance models were once again called 'Cudas’. The AAR 'Cuda’ was no longer available. To deal with increasingly strict emission laws, Plymouth was forced to detune some of their engines, resulting in a drop in the power ratings. Only 115 Hemi 'Cudas’ were sold and Plymouth decided to retire the Hemi engine before it had to be detuned to meet the new emission standards. Therefore, the Hemi would end its reign as the most feared and possibly most influential engine of the muscle car era.


Production Numbers
'Cuda’ Hardtop Coupe: 6,228
'Cuda’ Convertible: 374


Engines Offered
318 V8 230 bhp.
340 V8 275 bhp @ 5000 rpm, 340 lb-ft @ 3200 rpm.
383 V8 300 bhp @ 4400 rpm, 400 lb-ft @ 2400 rpm.
426 Hemi V8 425 bhp @ 5000 rpm, 490 lb-ft @ 4000 rpm.
440 V8 375 bhp.
440+6 V8 385 bhp @ 4600 rpm, 480 lb-ft @ 2300 rpm.




1972 Plymouth Barracuda

In 1972,the Hemi and the 383 engines were retired because they couldn't meet the new emission standards. The remaining engines had to be detuned and were now rated in net horsepower numbers, which on the surface seemed like a huge drop in power. Unfortunately, the top engine choice for the Barracuda was the 340 cid V8 and the convertible was no longer available.


Production Numbers
'Cuda’ Hardtop Coupe: 7,828


Engines Offered
318 V8 150 bhp. (SAE Net)
340 V8 240 bhp. (SAE Net)




1973 Plymouth Barracuda

The six-cylinder engine was removed and the entry-level model now had the 318 V8. Optional was the 340 V8, which came standard on the 'Cuda’. In mid year, the 340’s were replaced by a new 360 cid V8.


Production Numbers
'Cuda’ Hardtop Coupe: 10,626


Engines Offered
318 V8 150 bhp. (SAE Net)
340 V8 240 bhp. (SAE Net)
360 V8 245 bhp. (SAE Net)




1974 Plymouth Barracuda

1974 was the last year for the true Barracudas, which continued with 318 and 360 engines. The Barracuda would never return again as a true performance vehicle.


Production Numbers
'Cuda’ Hardtop Coupe: 4,989


Engines Offered
318 V8 150 bhp. (SAE Net)
360 V8 245 bhp. (SAE Net)




Dodge Charger

​Production of the Dodge charger started in 1966 and was manufactured until 1974. The real interest started in 1968 with a new body style.




1968 Dodge Charger R/T

1968 saw a dramatic redesign of the Dodge Charger with a new hidden headlight grille, a redesigned body, recessed backlight, refined tail, and minimal use of chrome. This redesign resulted in a six-fold increase in sales from 1967. Out of the 92,590 Chargers produced for 1968, 17,665 had the R/T package with its standard 440 Magnum engine and "Scat Pack" bumblebee stripes on the rear end. Only 475 came with a Hemi. The Hemi was strengthened for 1968 with a slightly longer-duration cam, new valve springs, and revisions, which reduced oil consumption. It was rated at 425bhp.


Production: 17,665

Engines: 318 V8 230bhp. 383 V8 335bhp. 426 V8 Hemi 425bhp@5000rpm, 490lb-ft@4000rpm. 440 V8 375bhp@4600rpm, 480lb-ft@3200rpm.




1969 Dodge Charger R/T

1969 saw little change for the regular Dodge Charger. Instead, Dodge released two special versions of the Charger, in order to better compete in NASCAR. The first was the Charger 500, which was basically a 1968 Charger with improved aerodynamics. The Charger 500 had a flush mounted Coronet grille with a flush mounted rear window over the recessed backlight. Although the Charger 500 had some racing success, Dodge engineers felt they could do more. They went back to the wind tunnel and came back with the Dodge Charger Daytona, the most outrageous muscle car of the era. In front, the Daytona sported a pointed 18-inch nose extension, which reduced drag and enhanced down force. In the rear, the Daytona retained the 500's recessed backlight but added a horizontal tail stabilizer on tall vertical extensions (wing). The wing had to be tall enough on production versions in order to open the trunk and some dealers had to remove them in order to sell the cars. Priced at $4,000, the Daytona’s were available with either the 440 or the 426 Hemi and 503 vehicles were eventually sold. Weighing almost 300 pounds more than regular Chargers with the same engines, they could top out at over 150 mph on the track -- and it was completely street legal. This was the pinnacle of the muscle car era.


Production: 20,057
Engines: 318 V8 230bhp. 383 V8 335bhp. 426 V8 Hemi 425bhp@5000rpm, 490lb-ft@4000rpm. 440 V8 375bhp@4600rpm, 480lb-ft@3200rpm.



1970 Dodge Charger

1970 saw another redesign of the Dodge Charger, which now had a new chrome loop front bumper, and a full width tail lamp housing. R/T versions gained a simulated reverse body scoop. Wild colors such as Plum Crazy and Go-Mango became available and a pistol-grip handle now topped the available four-speed shifter. Also available was the extra cost SE version with its leather upholstery and for the first time there was an available electric sliding sunroof. Performance buffs cheered at the addition of a new engine choice, the 440 six pack. Slotted between the 440 Magnum and the Hemi, the 440 Six Pack traded in the 440's 4 barrel carburetor for 3 Holley two barrels, increasing the horsepower from 375 bhp to 390 bhp. The Hemi was also improved, with the addition of hydraulic lifters, instead of solid tappets. Still, rising insurance costs took their toll and only 10,337 R/Ts were sold in 1970. Of these a mere 116 were 440 Six Packs and only 42 were Hemi’s.


Production: 10,337
Engines: 318 V8 230bhp. 383 V8 335bhp. 426 V8 Hemi 425bhp@5000rpm, 490lb-ft@4000rpm. 440 V8 375bhp@4600rpm, 480lb-ft@3200rpm. 440 Six Pack V8 390bhp@4700rpm, 490lb-ft@3200rpm



1971 Dodge Charger

1971 saw the down turnoff the Charger as well. While other manufacturers were decreasing their engine ratings, Chrysler held on as long as it could. The Hemi retained its 425bhp rating while the 440 lost 5bhp to 370bhp and the 440 Six Pack lost 5bhp to 385bhp. The redesigned 1971 Charger lost two inches of wheelbase and gained Coke bottle styling. It now shared its body with the Dodge Super Bee and was still available in R/T and SE trim. The R/T version was particularly bold with its standard blackout hood, simulated body side air extractors, Rallye wheels, tape stripes, and optional front and rear spoilers. The Hemi breathed through an Air Grabber type hood scoop activated by a dashboard switch. A full range of bold colors was available from "Green Go" to "Citron Yella." This body style would last until 1974, but this would prove to be the last year for the 426 Hemi. 


Production:
Engines: 318 V8 230bhp. 383 V8 335bhp. 426 V8 Hemi 425bhp@5000rpm, 490lb-ft@4000rpm. 440 V8 370bhp. 440 Six Pack V8 385bhp



1972 Dodge Charger

Starting in 1972, Chrysler had to detune its engines to meet stricter emissions laws. They also began to quote engine ratings in terms of net output (engine output with all accessories), rather than gross output. This lead to some dramatic "declines" in rated engine power. With the Hemi gone, the 440 Six Pack became the top engine choice. Its output dropped from 385bhp gross to 330bhp net. The regular 4 bbl 440 dropped from 370bhp gross to 280bhp net. The 383’s was unable to meet the new emissions requirements and was dropped. A new 400 V8, which offered 255bhp net, took its place.


Production:
Engines: 318 V8. 400 V8 255bhp net. 440 V8 280bhp net. 440 Six Pack V8 330bhp net

1969 Dodge Charger

Hemi production numbers

1968 4-Spd Auto Canada Export Total
Plymouth Road Runner 576 443 - - 1019
Plymouth GTX 234 216 - - 450
Dodge Super Bee Hardtop 38 54 - - 92
Dodge Super Bee Coupe 31 94 - - 125
Dodge Coronet R/T Hardtop and Convertible 94 136 - - 230
Dodge Charger R/T 211 264 - - 475
1969 4-Spd Auto Canada Export Total
Plymouth Road Runner Hardtop 234 188 14 - 436
Plymouth Road Runner Coupe 194 162 22 - 378
Plymouth Road Runner Convertible 4 6 2 - 12
Plymouth GTX Hardtop 98 98 11 - 207
Plymouth GTX Convertible 5 6 5 - 16
Dodge Coronet Super Bee Coupe 38 53 12 - 103
Dodge Coronet R/T Hardtop 58 39 4 - 120
Dodge Coronet R/T Convertible 4 6 4 - 14
Dodge Charger R/T 207 225 29 - 461
Dodge Charger 500 - (Transmission data unavailable)* * * 1 - 32
Dodge Charger Daytona - (Transmission data unavailable)* 22 48 5 - 75
1970 4-Spd Auto Canada Export Total
Plymouth Road Runner Hardtop 59 16 6 - 81
Plymouth Road Runner Coupe 44 30 7 - 81
Plymouth Road Runner Convertible 1 2 1 - 4
Plymouth Road Runner Superbird 58 77 1 - 136
Plymouth GTX Hardtop 43 29 5 - 77
Plymouth 'Cuda Hardtop 248 368 44 - 696
Plymouth 'Cuda Convertible 5 9 3 1 18
Dodge Coronet Super Bee Hardtop 21 11 2 - 34
Dodge Coronet Super Bee Coupe 4 0 4 - 8
Dodge Coronet R/T Hardtop 4 9 1 - 14
Dodge Coronet R/T Convertible 1 0 1 - 2
Dodge Charger R/T 56 56 12 - 124
Dodge Challenger R/T Hardtop 137 150 19 - 306
Dodge Challenger R/T Convertible 5 4 3 - 12
Dodge Challenger RT/SE Hardtop 23 37 4 - 64
1971 4-Spd Auto Canada Export Total
Plymouth Road Runner 28 27 4 - 59
Plymouth GTX 11 19 2 - 32
Plymouth 'Cuda Hardtop 59 48 11 - 118
Plymouth 'Cuda Convertible 2 5 2 2 11
Dodge Charger Super Bee 9 13 1 - 23
Dodge Charger R/T 30 33 12 - 75
Dodge Challenger R/T Hardtop 58 12 5 - 75